7 Resources Found

Supporting reconciliation in post-conflict situations

Iffat Idris, GSDRC

Download full PDF from gsdrc.org

2 October 2016

This report covers several approaches to supporting reconciliation in post-conflict contexts. Designed as an e-learning document, the report provides general information about a variety of approaches, pros and cons of said approaches, indications of what roles donors can play, and covers Islamic reconciliation modalities available.

The Six Grave Violations against Children during Armed Conflict: The Legal Foundation

UN Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict (OSRSG-CAAC)

Download full PDF from childrenandarmedconflict.un.org

October 2009

This resource lays out the legal basis for the UN Security Council’s prioritization of six grave violations committed against children during armed conflict. It is intended to serve as a legal guide to help strengthen child protection and end impunity of crimes. It draws on international humanitarian law, human rights law, jurisprudence, and UN Security Council resolutions to establish killing and maiming, recruitment and use in conflict, rape and sexual violence, abduction, attacks against schools and hospitals, and denial of humanitarian access as the most serious crimes committed against children in situations of armed conflict.

Rule-of-Law Tools for Post-Conflict States: Amnesties

UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)

Download full PDF from ohchr.org

2009

Intended for practitioners, this resource explores the concept of amnesty and considers the relationship between amnesties and other processes of transitional justice, such as truth commissions, the right to remedy and reparations, and disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programs. This resource also incorporates relevant rules of international law and United Nations policy when drafting amnesties.

The Paris Principles. Principles and Guidelines on Children Associated with Armed Forces or Armed Groups

UNICEF

Download full PDF from unicef.org

February 2007

The Paris Commitments and Principles and Guidelines on children associated with armed forces or armed groups consolidate global humanitarian knowledge and experience in working to prevent recruitment, protect children, support their release from armed forces or armed groups and reintegrate them into civilian life. The Paris Principles and Commitments build on the Cape Town principles and best practices on the recruitment of children into the armed forces and on demobilization and social reintegration of child soldiers in Africa (Cape Town principles) which were adopted in 1997.

Basic Principles and Guidelines on the Right to Remedy and Reparation for Victims of Gross Violations of International Human Rights Law and Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law

United Nations General Assembly

See full resource on ohchr.org

December 2005

This UN General Assembly resolution provides principles related to State's obligations concerning reparations to victims of international humanitarian and human rights abuses. Victims have a right to be treated humanely and with respect, to access justice and relevant information, and to be afforded adequate and effective reparation without discrimination.

A Fighting Chance: Guidelines and implications for programmes involving children associated with armed groups and armed forces

Save the Children

Download full PDF from resourcecentre.savethechildren.se

2004

Intended for staff of Save the Children, this document provides guidelines for programs related to children associated with armed groups and armed forces. The resource contains an overview of key protection issues, international standards, and Save the Children’s program experience. It also considers prevention, monitoring and reporting of recruitment and re-recruitment, challenges facing girls, and children conceived or born to girls in armed groups and armed forces.

Justice in Matters involving child victims and witnesses of crime: Online training

UN Office on Drugs and Crimes (UNODC); UNICEF

See full resource on unodc.org

This free online self-learning tool is intended for practitioners working in an area related to child victims and witnesses of crime. Registration is required.

Submit a resource

Website or location of resource (required)

Description of resource

Your name, organization, and email address