16 Resources Found

Implementing the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court

Case Matrix Network

See full resource on blog.casematrixnetwork.org

26 September 2017

These guidelines were created for national legislators, policy makers, and other accountability stakeholders who would benefit from learning about the different approaches States may have for the domestic implementation of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. The purpose of this tool is to enable the reader to identify the appropriate method for incorporating international crime provisions into domestic legislation, address associated challenges, understand the core components that must be implemented, and guide national legislators through the implementation process. Section 12 (p.111-115) contains a helpful implementation checklist outlining the guiding principles which can be tailored to each State's priorities and individual concerns.

Policy on Children

Office of the Prosecutor, International Criminal Court

See full resource on icc-cpi.int

1 November 2016

The International Criminal Court Office of the Prosecutor recognizes that most crimes under the Statute affect children in various ways, and that at times they are specifically targeted. The Office engages with children in various contexts and circumstances, notably children who are witnesses and those whose parents or caregivers have agreed to testify before the Court. In these interactions, the Office will consider the best interests, rights and well-being of children who are directly impacted by its activities. The Office will strive to ensure that its activities do no harm to the children with whom it interacts. The Office will adopt a child-sensitive approach in all aspects of its work involving children. This policy guides applying this approach.

Supporting reconciliation in post-conflict situations

Iffat Idris, GSDRC

Download full PDF from gsdrc.org

2 October 2016

This report covers several approaches to supporting reconciliation in post-conflict contexts. Designed as an e-learning document, the report provides general information about a variety of approaches, pros and cons of said approaches, indications of what roles donors can play, and covers Islamic reconciliation modalities available.

Handbook on Complementarity- An Introduction to the Role of National Courts and the ICC in Prosecuting International Crimes

Paul Seils, International Center for Transitional Justice

See full resource on ictj.org

22 July 2016

This Handbook is intended to explain the main issues of law and practice related to complementarity for those who are not legal specialists. It is aimed at organizations and individuals that are not specicalists on the International Criminal Court or criminal law issues. It supports those who want to understand the basic legal issues as well as the broader contextual matters connected to complementarity by explaining how the complementarity regime works. After reading this handbook, readers should have a basic understanding of the ICC, the concept of complementarity, how key cases on the issue have been decided, what the different stages of the admissibility process entail, what it means for national legal systems, and what it means for other national actors, including civil society and victims’ representatives. Case studies include the following countries: Afghanistan, Colombia, Cote d’Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, and Libya. This resource is also available in French.

Children in Armed Conflict Accountability Framework: A Framework for Advancing Accountability for Serious Violations against Children in Armed Conflict

Conflict Dynamics International

Download full PDF from cacaccountability.org

2015

This Framework is a practical resource that promotes accountability for serious violations of international law committed against children in armed conflict (CAC). It responds to the significant gap that exists in preventing and remedying these serious violations - and is designed to assist policymakers and practitioners working at all levels to bridge this gap. It provides individuals and organizations working in child protection, justice, peacebuilding, and related fields with a comprehensive definition and structure for understanding CAC accountability and practical guidance for developing well-informed, context-specific, and feasible options for advancing CAC accountability.

Marco de Rendición de Cuentas frente a los niños, las niñas y los jóvenes afectados por los conflictos armados

Conflict Dynamics International

Download full PDF from cacaccountability.org

2015

This resource is the Spanish version of the "Children in Armed Conflict Accountability Framework." El Marco de Rendición de Cuentas frente a los niños, las niñas y los jóvenes afectados por los conflictos armados es un recurso práctico que promueve mecanismos para abordar casos de violaciones graves derecho internacional cometidas contra los niños, las niñas y los jóvenes en situaciones de conflicto armado (rendición de cuentas sobre NNJ). Elaborado como respuesta al importante vacío existente en materia de prevención y reparación de este tipo de violaciones, este Marco aporta los siguientes elementos: 1. una definición completa y estructura para entender la cuestión de la rendición de cuentas sobre NNJ; 2. orientaciones metodológicas prácticas que pueden ser adaptadas y aplicadas en diferentes contextos con el objeto de aumentar las acciones de rendición de cuentas sobre NNJ.

The 1612 Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism: A Resource Pack for NGOs

Watchlist on Children and Armed Conflict

See full resource on watchlist.org

2015

This resource provides an overview of the UN's Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism (MRM), which documents the six grave violations perpetrated against children in situations of armed conflict. It aims to provide tools for non-governmental organizations participating in the MRM to mainstream their engagement. Tools include guiding questions, checklists, self-assessments and sample language. The resource also considers case studies from the Gaza Strip, Myanmar, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), and Colombia.

Study on Field-based Programmatic Measures to Protect Education from Attack

Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack (GCPEA)

Download full PDF from educationandconflict.org

December 2011

This resource outlines types of programmatic measures to protect education from attack under four headings: protection, prevention, advocacy, and monitoring and reporting. Attacks against education include attacks against students, educators, and other educational personnel at educational institutions. Recommended programmatic measures range from local initiatives to systemic-level interventions intended to prevent conflict. The annex includes 20 country-specific examples.

Bridging the Accountability Gap: New Approaches to Addressing Violations Against Children in Armed Conflict

Julia Freedson, Conflict Dynamics International

Download full PDF from cdint.org

June 2011

This resource examines the accountability gap for violations committed against children in situations of armed conflict. It evaluates actions to attain accountability through efforts at the national level, UN Security Council, and international level. The report provides several policy options to address the accountability gap and features case studies in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Colombia.

Children and Security Sector Reform in Post-conflict Peace-building

David Nosworthy, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre

Download full PDF from unicef-irc.org

June 2010

This resource considers children and youth in the post-conflict peacebuilding phase of restoring justice and security. It discusses national structures and mechanisms, such as hybrid courts, domestic prosecution, and truth commissions, and articulates their relevance to children and young people. This report also explores the role of civil society organizations in building accountability and good governance within the security sector.

DDR, Transitional Justice, and the Reintegration of Former Child Combatants

Roger Duthie and Irma Specht, International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ)

Download full PDF from ictj.org

February 2010

This resource explores how transitional justice measures may positively affect former child combatants by reducing social exclusion from their communities. It considers several issues in relation to reintegration of children; such issues include truth-telling, reparations, local justice, and prosecutions.

What is Transitional Justice?

International Center for Transitional Justice

Download full PDF from ictj.org

1 January 2009

This two-page fact sheet describes transitional justice; where it came from and how it is used as a response to systematic or widespread violations of human rights. The aims of transitional justice will vary depending on the context but these features are constant: the recognition of the dignity of individuals; the redress and acknowledgment of violations; and the aim to prevent them happening again. Transitional justice is often approached in the following forms: criminal prosecutions, truth seeking/fact finding, reparations, reforms. More information is also available on the International Center for Transitional Justice website: https://www.ictj.org/about/transitional-justice

Implementing Victims’ Rights: A Handbook on the Basic Principles and Guidelines on the Right to a Remedy and Reparation

REDRESS

Download full PDF from redress.org

March 2006

This resource was created as a companion to the UN’s Basic Principles and Guidelines on the Right to a Remedy and Reparation for Victims of Gross Violations of International Human Rights Law and Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law. It was intended to help guide non-governmental and civil society organizations advocate for victims’ rights as primary concern in state action.

Rule-of-Law Tools for Post-Conflict States: Truth Commissions

UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)

Download full PDF from ohchr.org

2006

This resource establishes principles and standards for the creation of truth commissions and explores core operational activities such as statement-taking, building a database, research and investigations, public hearings, public outreach, and report writing. It also explores the link between truth commissions, prosecutions, reparations, vetting, and reforms. The role of national and international NGOs in truth commissions is considered. Meant to assist field missions and transitional administrations, this resource uses lessons learned from previous UN field missions in Sierra Leone and Timor-Leste.

Sexual and Gender-Based Violence against Refugees, Returnees and Internally Displaced Persons: Guidelines for Prevention and Response

UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

See full resource on unhcr.org

May 2003

This resource provides guidance for protection of refugees against sexual and gender-based violence. It provides guiding principles and considers prevention strategies through transforming socio-cultural norms, rebuilding community support systems, improving accountability systems, and monitoring and documenting of sexual and gender-based violence. The annex includes a code of conduct and sample report forms.

Ukweli: Handbook on Monitoring and Documenting Human Rights Violations in Africa

Amnesty International; Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA)

Download full PDF from amnesty.nl

2000

This resource defines key activities related to human rights contact-building, monitoring, fact-finding, and documenting. It also defines the principles of accuracy, confidentiality, impartiality, and gender-sensitivity for conducting research on human rights violations. Based on the experience of African human rights defenders, this resource provides guidance for national and local human rights organizations and activists who are new to human rights research and human rights law. An accompanying ‘A Handbook for Community Activists’ is also available.

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