8 Resources Found

International Criminal Law Guidelines on Sexual and Gender-Based Violence Crimes

Case Matrix Network

See full resource on legal-tools.org

1 June 2017

These Guidelines aim to support the application of accountability initiatives by providing a concise overview of the legal requirements of seven underlying acts of sexual and gender-based violence crimes (SGBV) proscribed under the ICC Statute: rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, forced pregnancy, enforced sterilisation, other forms of sexual violence and genocide by measures intended to prevent births. The Guidelines are directed to practitioners who wish to familiarise themselves with the legal requirements of SGBV crimes under international criminal law. Emblematic international case law as well as commentaries of independent human rights experts and leading publicists that address the seven SGBV crimes under the International Criminal Court Statute are reviewed.

Policy on Children

Office of the Prosecutor, International Criminal Court

See full resource on icc-cpi.int

1 November 2016

The International Criminal Court Office of the Prosecutor recognizes that most crimes under the Statute affect children in various ways, and that at times they are specifically targeted. The Office engages with children in various contexts and circumstances, notably children who are witnesses and those whose parents or caregivers have agreed to testify before the Court. In these interactions, the Office will consider the best interests, rights and well-being of children who are directly impacted by its activities. The Office will strive to ensure that its activities do no harm to the children with whom it interacts. The Office will adopt a child-sensitive approach in all aspects of its work involving children. This policy guides applying this approach.

The Six Grave Violations against Children during Armed Conflict: The Legal Foundation

UN Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict (OSRSG-CAAC)

Download full PDF from childrenandarmedconflict.un.org

October 2009

This resource lays out the legal basis for the UN Security Council’s prioritization of six grave violations committed against children during armed conflict. It is intended to serve as a legal guide to help strengthen child protection and end impunity of crimes. It draws on international humanitarian law, human rights law, jurisprudence, and UN Security Council resolutions to establish killing and maiming, recruitment and use in conflict, rape and sexual violence, abduction, attacks against schools and hospitals, and denial of humanitarian access as the most serious crimes committed against children in situations of armed conflict.

Rule-of-Law Tools for Post-Conflict States: Amnesties

UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)

Download full PDF from ohchr.org

2009

Intended for practitioners, this resource explores the concept of amnesty and considers the relationship between amnesties and other processes of transitional justice, such as truth commissions, the right to remedy and reparations, and disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programs. This resource also incorporates relevant rules of international law and United Nations policy when drafting amnesties.

The Paris Principles. Principles and Guidelines on Children Associated with Armed Forces or Armed Groups

UNICEF

Download full PDF from unicef.org

February 2007

The Paris Commitments and Principles and Guidelines on children associated with armed forces or armed groups consolidate global humanitarian knowledge and experience in working to prevent recruitment, protect children, support their release from armed forces or armed groups and reintegrate them into civilian life. The Paris Principles and Commitments build on the Cape Town principles and best practices on the recruitment of children into the armed forces and on demobilization and social reintegration of child soldiers in Africa (Cape Town principles) which were adopted in 1997.

Basic Principles and Guidelines on the Right to Remedy and Reparation for Victims of Gross Violations of International Human Rights Law and Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law

United Nations General Assembly

See full resource on ohchr.org

December 2005

This UN General Assembly resolution provides principles related to State's obligations concerning reparations to victims of international humanitarian and human rights abuses. Victims have a right to be treated humanely and with respect, to access justice and relevant information, and to be afforded adequate and effective reparation without discrimination.

A Fighting Chance: Guidelines and implications for programmes involving children associated with armed groups and armed forces

Save the Children

Download full PDF from resourcecentre.savethechildren.se

2004

Intended for staff of Save the Children, this document provides guidelines for programs related to children associated with armed groups and armed forces. The resource contains an overview of key protection issues, international standards, and Save the Children’s program experience. It also considers prevention, monitoring and reporting of recruitment and re-recruitment, challenges facing girls, and children conceived or born to girls in armed groups and armed forces.

Monitoring and Investigating Human Rights Abuses in Armed Conflict

Amnesty International; Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA)

Download full PDF from amnesty.nl

2001

This resource considers monitoring human rights abuses in situations of armed conflict and provides information required to prepare for fact-finding missions, as well as guidelines on how to investigate and verify information and determine sufficient proof. The annexes include relevant international and regional human rights laws in Africa. An overview of human rights abuses against children in situations of armed conflict is provided on page 33.

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