34 Resources Found

Practical Guide to Foster Community Acceptance of Girls Associated with Armed Groups in DR Congo

Child Soldiers International

See full resource on child-soldiers.org

19 June 2017

This Guide provides best practice measures for engaging girls formerly associated with armed groups in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, who are often under-represented in disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration programs. Based on workshops conducted with child protection officials, UN agencies, government agents, and NGOs, it proposes interventions to respond to girl soldiers' specific needs and experiences. This guide focuses on solutions which are inexpensive and community based, making them applicable in various contexts. Originally published in French, the first version can be accessed at: https://www.child-soldiers.org/shop/rsum-du-guide-pratique-pour-promouvoir-lacceptation-communautaire

Addressing the Gaps in Security Sector Training: The Detention of Child Soldiers

Dr. Shelly Whitman, Dustin Johnson, Darin Reeves

See full resource on childsoldiers.org

1 March 2017

This chapter (p.389-402) in the book "Protecting Children against Torture in Detention: Global Solutions for a Global Problem" published by the Anti-Torture Initiative at the Washington College of Law explores the unique role of child soldiers as children, victims, and as soldiers which each must be considered in the comprehensive response of security sector actors in their demobilization and protection. Case studies of child soldiers detained as security threats and violations they experience including torture, ill-treatment, and arbitrary detention highlight the urgent need for better training in the security sector. Recommendations for the training of security sector actors on child soldiers includes to frame trainings in the overall prevention of child soldiers, pre-deployment training for confrontation with child soldiers, and the inclusion of specific child protection concerns in line with the 'best interests of the child' principle.

Reducing Risk, Strengthening Resilience: Toward the Structural Prevention of Atrocity Crimes

Alex Bellamy, Stanley Foundation

Download full PDF from stanleyfoundation.org

1 April 2016

This is a policy brief that outlines how to apply structural prevention of atrocity crimes, particularly at the national and local level. The recommendations intend to assist actors to reduce the occurrence of risk factors of atrocities and increase societal resilience. Particular to addressing serious violations against children in armed conflict, this brief includes rule of law, accountability, and commitment to guarantees of non-recurrence of violations as key to prevention and resilience. Also recommended is reforming legal and judicial systems for greater accountability and ensuring the legal empowerment of marginalized communities.

The Role of Communities in Protecting Education from Attack: Lessons Learned

Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack (GCPEA)

Download full PDF from protectingeducation.org

2014

This resource lays out guidelines for implementing programs that protect education from attack. Included is a 10-step guideline for working in collaboration with local communities, examples for various case studies around the world, and strategies for staffing, working with local partners, and using child participation. The document uses Cote d’Ivoire as a case study of how communities worked with UN agencies and international NGOs and presents key findings.

Education and the Law of Reparations in Insecurity and Armed Conflict

Francesca Capone, Kristin Hausler, Duncan Fairgrieve, Conor McCarthy, Protect Education in Insecurity and Conflict (PEIC); British Institute of International and Comparative Law

Download full PDF from educationandconflict.org

October 2013

With a focus on reparations, this resource examines how attacks against education during insecurity and armed conflict have previously been redressed and how they may be redressed in the future. It considers education as a form of reparation and explores how education may minimize the risk of future conflict. The appendix includes international and regional treaties, as well as relevant cases.

The Kampala Recommendations on the recovery and reintegration of children and youth affected by armed conflict

War Child Holland; Centre for Children in Vulnerable Situations

Download full PDF from warchildholland.org

2013

During the Kampala Conference from 25-27 September 2013, guidelines were launched on recovery and reintegration programming for child and youth affected by armed conflict. The Kampala Recommendations were drafted in consultation with experts from transitional justice, human rights, education, child rights, and youth from Uganda and Colombia.

Lessons in War: Military Use of Schools and other Education Institutions during Conflict

Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack (GCPEA)

Download full PDF from protectingeducation.org

November 2012

This resource outlines the military use of education institutions and the consequences of such use on students, teachers, and scholars. It includes an overview a list of initiatives to address armed forces’ and armed groups’ use of education institutions, including the UN Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism, Committee of the Rights of the Child, and voluntary commitments by non-state armed groups. It also provides relevant laws restricting the use of education institutions by armed forces and groups.

Guiding Principles for the Domestic Implementation of a Comprehensive System of Protection for Children Associated with Armed Forces or Armed Groups

International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

Download full PDF from icrc.org

15 September 2011

This resource aims to clarify existing obligations of State parties, facilitate respect for existing obligations, and promote the implementation of relevant legal provisions. It contains recommendations by the ICRC for practical, regulatory, and legal measures to promote the effective domestic implementation of international rules to protect children affected by armed conflict. This resource considers specific issues such as recruitment, juvenile justice, preventative measures, reparations, transitional justice, and disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration programs.

Children and Justice During and in the Aftermath of Armed Conflict

UN Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict (OSRSG-CAAC)

Download full PDF from childrenandarmedconflict.un.org

September 2011

This resource supports advocacy initiatives aimed at strengthening States’ protection of children’s rights and best interests during and after armed conflict. It examines children as victims and witnesses in judicial processes such as courts and tribunals, and in non-judicial processes such as truth and reconciliation commissions and traditional and restorative justice mechanisms. This report also looks at the concepts of reparations and reintegration. It uses the international legal framework and case studies to create recommendations for States, UN agencies, civil society organizations, and child protection actors.

Bridging the Accountability Gap: New Approaches to Addressing Violations Against Children in Armed Conflict

Julia Freedson, Conflict Dynamics International

Download full PDF from cdint.org

June 2011

This resource examines the accountability gap for violations committed against children in situations of armed conflict. It evaluates actions to attain accountability through efforts at the national level, UN Security Council, and international level. The report provides several policy options to address the accountability gap and features case studies in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Colombia.

Workshop report: Children affected by armed conflict and other situations of violence

International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

Download full PDF from icrc.org

14 March 2011

This resource represents the thinking of the International Movement for the Red Cross on building bridges between practitioners from various contexts and areas of expertise. This resource identifies priorities for action and recommendations for better coordination across the Movement and focuses on themes such as reintegration, psychosocial approach, violence prevention in urban violence, and cross-cutting issues such as youth participation.

The Education of Former Child Soldiers: Finding a Way Back to Civilian Identity

Ozen Guven, Amy Kapit-Spitalny, Dana Burde, Protect Education in Insecurity and Conflict (PEIC)

Download full PDF from educationandconflict.org

2011

This resource summarizes types of programmatic interventions for children formerly associated with armed forces and groups to continue their education. Education programs include integration into existing school programs, accelerated learning, and vocational studies. It identifies elements of successful programs for children’s reintegration into civilian life and principles such as avoiding stigmatization, promoting inclusion, and long-term financial support. Appendix II includes a comparison of a rights-based approach and economic approach in programmatic approaches.

Prosecuting International Crimes Against Children: The Legal Framework

Christine Bakker, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre

Download full PDF from unicef-irc.org

June 2010

This resource provides an overview of state obligations under international law to prosecute persons accused of genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, torture and enforced disappearances, specifically focusing on crimes against children. Using an example of the Omar Khadr case, this resource also explores international norms regarding children accused of participating in the commission of these crimes.

Children and Armed Conflict: A Guide to International Humanitarian and Human Rights Law

International Bureau for Children’s Rights (ICBR)

Download full PDF from ibcr.org

2010

This resource provides an overview of the international legal framework, and explains the practical applicability of the law and standards as they relate to children and armed conflict. This resource also discusses internally displaced children; sexual violence against children; child labor; children and landmines and cluster bombs; children and small armed and light weapons; child victims, witnesses and perpetrators of crimes; and the role of children in peace processes.

Knowledge on Fire: Attacks on Education in Afghanistan, Risks and Measures for Successful Mitigation

CARE International, Afghan Ministry of Education

Download full PDF from care.org

September 2009

A case study of Afghanistan, this resource provides an overview of threats and attacks on education, including the nature of attacks and risk factors. It concludes with recommendations about how to mitigate and prevent attacks on schools, paying special attention to the roles of communities.

Children’s and Adolescents’ Participation and Protection From Sexual Abuse and Exploitation

Clare Feinstein and Claire O’Kane, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre

Download full PDF from unicef-irc.org

February 2009

This resource highlights government commitments regarding the participation of children and adolescents in combating sexual abuse and exploitation. It includes children’s recommendations to end abuse and exploitation and provides recommendations for strengthening child and youth participation in child protection.

Youth and Conflict: Best Practices and Lessons Learned

Mercy Corps

Download full PDF from mercycorps.org

2009

The resource examines Mercy Corps’ best practices and lessons learned on its youth programming, including general program design and implementation. It also considers specific program areas such as economic engagement, political participation, youth-to-community connections, and youth-to-youth connections.

The Paris Commitments to protect children from unlawful recruitment or use by armed forces or armed groups

UNICEF

Download full PDF from childrenandarmedconflict.un.org

February 2007

The Paris Commitments and Principles and Guidelines on children associated with armed forces or armed groups consolidate global humanitarian knowledge and experience in working to prevent recruitment, protect children, support their release from armed forces or armed groups and reintegrate them into civilian life. The Paris Principles and Commitments build on the Cape Town principles and best practices on the recruitment of children into the armed forces and on demobilization and social reintegration of child soldiers in Africa (Cape Town principles) which were adopted in 1997.

The Paris Principles. Principles and Guidelines on Children Associated with Armed Forces or Armed Groups

UNICEF

Download full PDF from unicef.org

February 2007

The Paris Commitments and Principles and Guidelines on children associated with armed forces or armed groups consolidate global humanitarian knowledge and experience in working to prevent recruitment, protect children, support their release from armed forces or armed groups and reintegrate them into civilian life. The Paris Principles and Commitments build on the Cape Town principles and best practices on the recruitment of children into the armed forces and on demobilization and social reintegration of child soldiers in Africa (Cape Town principles) which were adopted in 1997.

Basic Principles and Guidelines on the Right to Remedy and Reparation for Victims of Gross Violations of International Human Rights Law and Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law

United Nations General Assembly

See full resource on ohchr.org

December 2005

This UN General Assembly resolution provides principles related to State's obligations concerning reparations to victims of international humanitarian and human rights abuses. Victims have a right to be treated humanely and with respect, to access justice and relevant information, and to be afforded adequate and effective reparation without discrimination.

The Disarmament, Demobilisation, and Reintegration of Children Associated with the Fighting Forces: Lessons Learned in Sierra Leone 1998-2002

UNICEF

Download full PDF from unicef.org

June 2005

This resource looks at the children’s aspect of Sierra Leone’s disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) program. It also provides an overview of DDR during and after the end of Sierra Leone’s civil war. Other topics covered include an analysis of girls in the DDR process, family tracing and reunification, alternative care, reintegration, strategies of prevention, and lessons learned.

Support to Former Child Soldiers: Programming and Proposal Evaluation Guide

Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)

Download full PDF from acdi-cida.gc.ca

May 2005

This resource provides best practices and lessons learned in programming for children affected by armed conflict, with a focus on child soldiers. In addition to an overview of the relevant international legal standards regarding the recruitment and use of children, this resource also provides a grid to evaluate proposals or design programs to support former child soldiers. Other tools include a risk probability and impact matrix and checklists on prevention, demobilization, and reintegration.

Reintegration of Child Soldiers in Sierra Leone

John Williamson, USAID

Download full PDF from pdf.usaid.gov

9 February 2005

From 1994 to 2004, USAID administrated a Displaced Children and Orphans Fund (DCOF) for child affected by conflict in Sierra Leone. This resource provides observations and lessons learned of DCOF-funded projects for children affected by armed conflict. The evaluation gives special attention to girls’ access to disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) programs in Sierra Leone. Page 17 identifies critical elements of successful reintegration of children associated with armed forces.

Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commissions Reports

Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission

See full resource on sierraleonetrc.org

2005

This resource is the final report of the Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission, held from 2002 to 2004. Volume Two, Chapter 3 contains recommendations concerning legal, political, and administrative reforms and measures, and includes a specific category for children. Volume Two, Chapter 4 provides the legal basis for reparations, lists categories for eligible beneficiaries, including children, and makes recommendations on according the benefits and effectively implementing the reparation program.

Children’s Participation in Humanitarian Action: learning from zones of armed conflict

Jason Hart, Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)

Download full PDF from acdi-cida.gc.ca

February 2004

This resource considers the benefits and challenges of child participation in situations of armed conflict. Protection benefits are categorized into areas such as personal empowerment, access to services, communal identity, and psychosocial well-being. This report also considers the benefits of child participation in areas of peacebuilding, such as inter-community exchange and addressing the causes of conflict. Fieldwork for this report was conducted in eastern Sri Lanka, the Occupied Palestinian Territories, and Nepal.

Inter-Agency Guiding Principles on Unaccompanied and Separated Children

International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

See full resource on icrc.org

January 2004

This resource focuses on children affected by armed conflict who become separated from their families, as well as unaccompanied children and orphans. It includes principles and guidelines for special issues related to refugee children and promoting children’s rights. The annex provides a list of key international instruments relating to separated children.

A Fighting Chance: Guidelines and implications for programmes involving children associated with armed groups and armed forces

Save the Children

Download full PDF from resourcecentre.savethechildren.se

2004

Intended for staff of Save the Children, this document provides guidelines for programs related to children associated with armed groups and armed forces. The resource contains an overview of key protection issues, international standards, and Save the Children’s program experience. It also considers prevention, monitoring and reporting of recruitment and re-recruitment, challenges facing girls, and children conceived or born to girls in armed groups and armed forces.

Children in War

International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

Download full PDF from icrc.org

2004

This resource contains ICRC documents related to children affected by armed conflict. Documents include: a summary table of international humanitarian law provisions applicable to children; an overview of child protection and humanitarian assistance activities for children; and a summary of the ICRC’s communication programs for young people and mine action programs.

Reaching the Girls: Study on Girls Associated with Armed Forces and Groups in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Beth Verhey, Save the Children

Download full PDF from resourcecentre.savethechildren.se

2004

This resource studies the situation of girls associated with armed forces in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and why girls are not reached by efforts to release children associated with armed groups. Section 5 provides recommendations on the formal demobilization of girls in the DRC.

Children and Armed Conflict: International Standards for Action

Office of the UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict (OSRSG-CAAC), Human Security Network

Download full PDF from unicef.org

April 2003

This resource is a compilation of legal standards and norms regarding children and armed conflict, including the rights of the child, international humanitarian law, law on refugees and internally displaced persons, international criminal law, and UN Security Council resolutions.

Legal Protection of Children in Armed Conflict

International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

Download full PDF from icrc.org

2003

A fact sheet developed by the ICRC’s advisory service on international humanitarian law, this resource explains the general and special legal protection afforded to children during armed conflict under the Geneva Conventions and Additional Protocols and the role of States and the International Criminal Court (ICC) in upholding these protection standards.

Child Soldiers: Preventing, Demobilizing and Reintegrating

Beth Verhey, World Bank

Download full PDF from worldbank.org

November 2001

Drawing on case studies from Angola and El Salvador, this resource provides examples, techniques and checklists on prevention, demobilization, and reintegration of child soldiers. It considers issues such as family reunification and community-based networks, psychosocial and traditional healing, and education and economic opportunity. It also includes checklists, lessons learned, and the international legal framework.

Children and The Truth and Reconciliation Commission for Sierra Leone: Recommendations for policies and procedures for addressing and involving children in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

UNICEF; National Forum for Human Rights; UNAMSIL

Download full PDF from unicef.org

June 2001

This resource contains recommendations from a technical meeting on children for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) of Sierra Leone held in 2001. The report outlines guiding principles for the truth and reconciliation commission, which include psycho-social support for children and child friendly environments. The resource concludes with participating children’s views and expectations of the TRC.

Children Not Soldiers: Guidelines for working with child soldiers and children associated with fighting forces

Isobel McConnan and Sarah Uppard, Save the Children

Download full PDF from resourcecentre.savethechildren.se

2001

This resource provides guidance for practitioners working with children involved in armed conflict. Part 1 includes an overview of the responsibilities of states, the international community, and non-state armed groups, and the legal framework that grounds all action to protect children associated with fighting forces. Part 2 addresses the military recruitment of children.

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