9 Resources Found

Addressing the Gaps in Security Sector Training: The Detention of Child Soldiers

Dr. Shelly Whitman, Dustin Johnson, Darin Reeves

See full resource on childsoldiers.org

1 March 2017

This chapter (p.389-402) in the book "Protecting Children against Torture in Detention: Global Solutions for a Global Problem" published by the Anti-Torture Initiative at the Washington College of Law explores the unique role of child soldiers as children, victims, and as soldiers which each must be considered in the comprehensive response of security sector actors in their demobilization and protection. Case studies of child soldiers detained as security threats and violations they experience including torture, ill-treatment, and arbitrary detention highlight the urgent need for better training in the security sector. Recommendations for the training of security sector actors on child soldiers includes to frame trainings in the overall prevention of child soldiers, pre-deployment training for confrontation with child soldiers, and the inclusion of specific child protection concerns in line with the 'best interests of the child' principle.

The Long Road: Accountability for Sexual Violence in Conflict and Post-Conflict Settings

Kim Thuy Seelinger and Julie Freccero

Download full PDF from law.berkeley.edu

2015

Researchers at the Human Rights Center at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, conducted a four-country study in Kenya, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Uganda to identify key accountability barriers and strategies for reporting, investigating, and prosecuting cases of sexual violence. The resulting 279 interviews identified key themes related to the reporting, investigation, and prosecution of cases of sexual violence for domestic accountability for sexual violence committed as an international crime. Recommendations for domestic actors from across health, legal, judicial, and community sectors are included to address survivors’ claims of sexual violence both during and after periods of armed conflict and other emergencies, with specific mention of children's particular needs within legal processes.

Summary of ICTJ’s Recommendations to the ICC on Reparations in the Lubanga Case

Ruben Carranza, International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ)

Download full PDF from ictj.org

2012

This resource summarizes the ICTJ’s submission to the International Criminal Court (ICC) giving recommendations on reparations to victims in the Lubanga case. Recommendations included: ensuring information and access to justice for victims; holding reparations hearings within the Democratic Republic of the Congo; designing a combination of compensation, rehabilitation, satisfaction, and symbolic reparations depending on the category of victim; conducting needs assessment and gender analysis; involving communities; and ensuring perpetrators pay reparations.

Guiding Principles for the Domestic Implementation of a Comprehensive System of Protection for Children Associated with Armed Forces or Armed Groups

International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

Download full PDF from icrc.org

15 September 2011

This resource aims to clarify existing obligations of State parties, facilitate respect for existing obligations, and promote the implementation of relevant legal provisions. It contains recommendations by the ICRC for practical, regulatory, and legal measures to promote the effective domestic implementation of international rules to protect children affected by armed conflict. This resource considers specific issues such as recruitment, juvenile justice, preventative measures, reparations, transitional justice, and disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration programs.

Through a New Lens: A Child-Sensitive Approach to Transitional Justice

Cécile Aptel and Virginie Ladisch, International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ)

Download full PDF from ictj.org

September 2011

Based on assessments of Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, and Nepal, this resource examines the ways in which transitional justice can engage children and consider their needs. It assesses the extent to which truth-seeking mechanisms, criminal justice, reparations, and institutional reform have raised awareness about the victimization of children.

Bridging the Accountability Gap: New Approaches to Addressing Violations Against Children in Armed Conflict

Julia Freedson, Conflict Dynamics International

Download full PDF from cdint.org

June 2011

This resource examines the accountability gap for violations committed against children in situations of armed conflict. It evaluates actions to attain accountability through efforts at the national level, UN Security Council, and international level. The report provides several policy options to address the accountability gap and features case studies in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Colombia.

Children and Security Sector Reform in Post-conflict Peace-building

David Nosworthy, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre

Download full PDF from unicef-irc.org

June 2010

This resource considers children and youth in the post-conflict peacebuilding phase of restoring justice and security. It discusses national structures and mechanisms, such as hybrid courts, domestic prosecution, and truth commissions, and articulates their relevance to children and young people. This report also explores the role of civil society organizations in building accountability and good governance within the security sector.

Prosecuting International Crimes Against Children: The Legal Framework

Christine Bakker, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre

Download full PDF from unicef-irc.org

June 2010

This resource provides an overview of state obligations under international law to prosecute persons accused of genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, torture and enforced disappearances, specifically focusing on crimes against children. Using an example of the Omar Khadr case, this resource also explores international norms regarding children accused of participating in the commission of these crimes.

Children Not Soldiers: Guidelines for working with child soldiers and children associated with fighting forces

Isobel McConnan and Sarah Uppard, Save the Children

Download full PDF from resourcecentre.savethechildren.se

2001

This resource provides guidance for practitioners working with children involved in armed conflict. Part 1 includes an overview of the responsibilities of states, the international community, and non-state armed groups, and the legal framework that grounds all action to protect children associated with fighting forces. Part 2 addresses the military recruitment of children.

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