7 Resources Found

Policy on Children

Office of the Prosecutor, International Criminal Court

See full resource on icc-cpi.int

1 November 2016

The International Criminal Court Office of the Prosecutor recognizes that most crimes under the Statute affect children in various ways, and that at times they are specifically targeted. The Office engages with children in various contexts and circumstances, notably children who are witnesses and those whose parents or caregivers have agreed to testify before the Court. In these interactions, the Office will consider the best interests, rights and well-being of children who are directly impacted by its activities. The Office will strive to ensure that its activities do no harm to the children with whom it interacts. The Office will adopt a child-sensitive approach in all aspects of its work involving children. This policy guides applying this approach.

The Paris Commitments to protect children from unlawful recruitment or use by armed forces or armed groups

UNICEF

Download full PDF from childrenandarmedconflict.un.org

February 2007

The Paris Commitments and Principles and Guidelines on children associated with armed forces or armed groups consolidate global humanitarian knowledge and experience in working to prevent recruitment, protect children, support their release from armed forces or armed groups and reintegrate them into civilian life. The Paris Principles and Commitments build on the Cape Town principles and best practices on the recruitment of children into the armed forces and on demobilization and social reintegration of child soldiers in Africa (Cape Town principles) which were adopted in 1997.

The Paris Principles. Principles and Guidelines on Children Associated with Armed Forces or Armed Groups

UNICEF

Download full PDF from unicef.org

February 2007

The Paris Commitments and Principles and Guidelines on children associated with armed forces or armed groups consolidate global humanitarian knowledge and experience in working to prevent recruitment, protect children, support their release from armed forces or armed groups and reintegrate them into civilian life. The Paris Principles and Commitments build on the Cape Town principles and best practices on the recruitment of children into the armed forces and on demobilization and social reintegration of child soldiers in Africa (Cape Town principles) which were adopted in 1997.

Support to Former Child Soldiers: Programming and Proposal Evaluation Guide

Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)

Download full PDF from acdi-cida.gc.ca

May 2005

This resource provides best practices and lessons learned in programming for children affected by armed conflict, with a focus on child soldiers. In addition to an overview of the relevant international legal standards regarding the recruitment and use of children, this resource also provides a grid to evaluate proposals or design programs to support former child soldiers. Other tools include a risk probability and impact matrix and checklists on prevention, demobilization, and reintegration.

A Fighting Chance: Guidelines and implications for programmes involving children associated with armed groups and armed forces

Save the Children

Download full PDF from resourcecentre.savethechildren.se

2004

Intended for staff of Save the Children, this document provides guidelines for programs related to children associated with armed groups and armed forces. The resource contains an overview of key protection issues, international standards, and Save the Children’s program experience. It also considers prevention, monitoring and reporting of recruitment and re-recruitment, challenges facing girls, and children conceived or born to girls in armed groups and armed forces.

Children in War

International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

Download full PDF from icrc.org

2004

This resource contains ICRC documents related to children affected by armed conflict. Documents include: a summary table of international humanitarian law provisions applicable to children; an overview of child protection and humanitarian assistance activities for children; and a summary of the ICRC’s communication programs for young people and mine action programs.

Child Soldiers: Preventing, Demobilizing and Reintegrating

Beth Verhey, World Bank

Download full PDF from worldbank.org

November 2001

Drawing on case studies from Angola and El Salvador, this resource provides examples, techniques and checklists on prevention, demobilization, and reintegration of child soldiers. It considers issues such as family reunification and community-based networks, psychosocial and traditional healing, and education and economic opportunity. It also includes checklists, lessons learned, and the international legal framework.

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